Caption that The engine really purrs

Caption that The engine really purrs

Lion Hayabusa

YOUR funniest caption, please.

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Source: Caption that The engine really purrs

Honda Paper advert

Honda Paper advert

WE wouldn’t normally feature an advert in the Viral section, but this is Honda’s latest, and as far as ads go, they’re usually quite good.

This one’s called ‘Paper’ and it takes you through six decades of Honda design using animation and hand drawn illustrations. It’s not completely about bikes (they feature at the beginning and mid-way through), but it’s pretty cool nonetheless.

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Source: Honda Paper advert

Could a new Yamaha FZ1 look like this

Could a new Yamaha FZ1 look like this

Yamaha Fazer 1000 mock up
A mock up of what a new FZ1 Fazer might look like

IS a new FZ1 Fazer on the way? Yamaha UK recently discontinued the existing FZ1, which could be a sign a replacement is coming, and now Japanese bike mag Young Machine has slapped this mock-up of an R1-influence FZ1 Fazer on its latest front cover. 

Frankly we don’t know whether to believe the prediction or not, but it would potentially make a good answer to Suzuki’s GSX-S1000F, wouldn’t it? 

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Source: Could a new Yamaha FZ1 look like this

New watercooled Triumph Bonneville seen in action in David Beckham film

New watercooled Triumph Bonneville seen in action in David Beckham film

HERE’S David Beckham in his first starring role, riding the new 2016 water-cooled Bonneville which Triumph has yet to officially reveal.  

The film, called Outlaws, shows the new Bonnie briefly at about 1.54 and 12.36. It’s the same machine seen two weeks ago in promotional stills for the film, by clothing maker Belstaff. Its radiator marks it out as water-cooled, unlike the current Bonneville. We’ve also seen it in spy shots

It’s one of several new variants of the Bonneville. This one is not replacing any specific existing model but expected to sit above the Thruxton as the sportiest version. Eschewing the fully-retro style of previous Bonnevilles, it adopts modern Öhlins suspension at both ends and Brembo radial brakes. There’s speculation that it could be called the Street Tracker – reflecting a trademark filed by Triumph – or perhaps the Speed Twin.

The engine is believed to be larger than the current Bonneville’s, and possibly 1100cc, although every prototype spotted so far – including three recently spied – has been registered as having the same 865cc capacity as the existing model. It will certainly be more powerful and cleaner thanks to its water-cooled design. We also saw a bobber version of the new Bonneville back in July.

Apart from the new bike, we’ve got no idea what we just saw, besides a convoluted love story, a bearded lady, Harvey Keitel and an implausible jump by Beckham. We do know it’s 17 minutes we’ll never get back and that Beckham’s first starring role doesn’t appear to involve him speaking. Who could have predicted that? 

Best skip to 1.54 and 12.36 – or click on our stills below.

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Source: New watercooled Triumph Bonneville seen in action in David Beckham film

BMW Side View a**ist in action

BMW Side View a**ist in action

BMW has updated its max-scooters and given the C 650 GT an optional ‘Side View a**ist’ blind-spot warning system – and here’s a video showing how it works.

The system uses ultrasound sensors at the front and rear of the scooter to detect objects in the rider’s blind spot up to a distance of five metres. When one is present, and travelling within 6.2mph of the speed of the scooter, a yellow warning triangle is illuminated in the left or right-hand mirror base, depending on which side the object is on. If the rider then indicates in the direction of the object, the warning triangle will start to flash. The system works when the scooter is travelling between 15 and 80mph. BMW says it’s a world first for a two-wheeler.

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Source: BMW Side View a**ist in action

Ducati Diavel Carbon updated for 2016

Ducati Diavel Carbon updated for 2016

Ducati Diavel Carbon
The 2016 Ducati Diavel Carbon

DUCATI has today unveiled the 2016 Diavel Carbon, which has been given a range of aesthetic and technical updates.

The most obvious major change to the 2016 Diavel Carbon is the paintwork; it now comes in new Asphalt Grey and carbon, with red stripes and black chrome paintwork on the frame.

Technical changes to the 2016 bike include the addition of a Zircotec coating on the exhaust manifolds and brushed effect stainless steel silencers. The wheels have also been redesigned, along with the seat, which has also been given a new ‘exclusive trim’.

The 2016 Diavel Carbon will be available from October 2015 and you can click here to see it in action.

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Source: Ducati Diavel Carbon updated for 2016

Limitededition MV Agusta F3 RC revealed

Limitededition MV Agusta F3 RC revealed

MV Agusta F3 RC

MV AGUSTA has unveiled this limited-edition F3 RC, a road-going replica of the machines ridden by Jules Cluzel and Lorenzo Zanetti in World Supersport.

Only 350 are to be produced – 100 F3 675 RCs and 250 F3 800 RCs – and each will be signed by MV Agusta Team Reparto Corse World Supersport riders Jules Cluzel and Lorenzo Zanetti. The RC stands for Reparto Corse, or Race Division.

Each of the limited-edition machines will have Cluzel’s autograph on the right-hand side and Zanetti’s on the left.  

MV said in a press release: ‘A road-going replica of the MV Agusta F3 by Jules Cluzel and Lorenzo Zanetti hot from the Schiranna Reparto Corse.  The F3 RC, produced in a limited edition of 100 bikes in the 675 configuration and 250 in the meatier 800 configuration, faithfully reproduces the graphics of the Jules Cluzel and Lorenzo Zanetti motorbike. To certify the originality of each bike, every F3RC is autographed by both riders, #16 Cluzel on the right side panel and #87 Lorenzo Zanetti on the left.’

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Source: Limitededition MV Agusta F3 RC revealed

UK road and track test Yamaha R1M review

Yamaha R1M on track
A straight-line missile.
Yamaha R1M on track
And pretty untouchable in the bends, too.
Yamaha R1M on track
Main rivals were present.
Yamaha R1M on track
Yamaha R1M on track
Yamaha R1M on track
Kane indicates the number of pies he would like at the end of the session.

Little touches on the R1M made me smile. I left home in the dark on the morning of my track test. The dash display had a black background. As I rode, the sun came up over the mist-covered fields. When the sun reached the bike the display background changed to white.

The R1M has a 200-section rear tyre where the R1’s is a 190. Both offer grip, drive and stability but the 200 offers slightly more contact patch.

On Snetterton’s 300 circuit, the R1M had the edge over everything else on the straights, and all the main competitors were present. With the right rider on-board, I think it would have the edge in the corners too.

It’s astonishingly fast everywhere. It feels and handles like a 600 on track and on the road. The stability in corners allows you to explore extreme lean angles – I managed to ground my fairing-mounted camera.

First gear is so tall that a lot of the time it’s all you need. It’s like a 200hp twist-and-go. Corner-to-corner, I was only using two gears with an occasional short-shift.

But it’s so fast that on the long Snet straights the rev limiter arrived almost before I could change up using the factory quick-shifter, which makes changes almost seamless. My peripheral vision felt blurred, and approaching corners felt like the ground rushing to meet you in a skydive.

Open the throttle and bikes ahead appear to be rushing backward.

Above 8,000rpm is where the afterburners kick in and you break the sound barrier. The R1 tended to lift and shake its head a little during that top-end power rush. With the R1M there was no wobble at all, even when I knew the front was off the ground. With the wheel off centre on a little ridge on the track, it was still completely solid. The Öhlins was doing everything necessary to keep the missile in line.

On the road, in London rush-hour traffic, the bike was still an absolute pleasure. Its lightweight handling had me filtering with ease. I could easily tuck in behind the 125s and scooters. The mirrors are really well placed to see behind you and easy to fold back to squeeze through gaps.

The bike is smooth at low speed and all the way through the rev range. On faster roads its flexible mid-range and aggressive peak are conducive to smooth progress.

Even with the power turned up the bike was smooth and comfortable. Cruising in a high gear it felt very civilised, while dropping a gear teleported me out in front of the traffic.

With the power map set on level two, everything is subtler. The throttle response is much more sedate, feeding in the drive smoothly. Power-delivery is softer, more suited to traffic.

But this bike can still bite, and opening the throttle requires forward planning.

The crossplane-crank engine has a loud bark, but the standard exhaust is quiet when cruising (and passed the track noise test with ease). I would keep the standard exhaust but some may want to change for a little more power. Because 200hp’s just not enough, is it?

With the 17-litre tank brimmed, I got a range of 118-120 miles on the motorway, 98-100 on a Sunday hack and 80-85 on track.

I took the R1M to two-biker cafés, and at both it quickly drew a crowd. There was a lot of interest at the track too.

When they do a remake of David Ess**’s film Silver Dream Racer, this will be the bike for the part.

Photo credit: Peter Wileman

Model tested: Yamaha YZF-R1M

Price: £18,749 plus on the road charges

Engine: 998cc in-line four

Power: 200hp

Torque: 83lbft

Wet weight: 199kg (full tank)

Tank capacity: 17 litres

Seat height: 855mm